FMJ March/April 2017 : Page 38

ON STANDARDS ESTABLISHING THE BOUNDARIES OF YOUR MSS BY C ASEY MAR TIN As a facility manager, your goal is to optimize your FM operations to support your organization’s mission and business objectives. You have likely heard about the value that standards can bring to an organization 1 and you’ve been considering implementing a management system standard (MSS). The first step, of course, is to determine which MSS is right for your organization — ISO 55000, Asset Management; ISO 22301, Societal security -Business continuity management systems -Requirements, etc. The article, “The Right Fit: Selecting an FM management system standard for your facilities” in the May/June 2016 issue of IFMA’s FMJ can give you some guidance there. As you look at the scope and requirements of any MSS, a natural next question might be, “How do I begin to eat that elephant?” Don’t be discouraged by what appears to be a massive, resource-heavy undertaking. This is the first in a series of articles that will help you break down the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) management system process into bite-sized pieces. It will help to understand that, while each MSS has its unique requirements, all ISO management systems begin with the familiar Deming Cycle — plan-do-check-act (PDCA) — as a framework (see figure 1). The first step in devouring the ISO elephant is to define the parameters for what will be included in the certification. These boundaries are not the MSS Clause 1: Scope that you see in Figure 1. These borders establish which parts of your organizational assets, facilities, processes, policies and locations will be included in the certification program. By defining these parameters early, you’ll be able to build the decisions that follow upon a foundation with defined edges. FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUSION You can base the decisions on which facilities to include on multiple criteria, such as organizational alignment, geographic considerations, or type of physical or technology asset. FIGURE 1 Relationship of ISO MSS to PDCA Cycle REQUIREMENTS CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE CLAUSE INTRODUCTION CLAUSE CLAUSE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Scope Normative References Terms and Definitions Context of the Organization Leadership Planning Support Operation Performance Evaluation Improvement PLAN DO CHECK ACT 38 WWW.IFMA . OR G/FMJ

Establishing the Boundaries of Your MSS

Casey Martin

As a facility manager, your goal is to optimize your FM operations to support your organization’s mission and business objectives. You have likely heard about the value that standards can bring to an organization1 and you’ve been considering implementing a management system standard (MSS).

The first step, of course, is to determine which MSS is right for your organization — ISO 55000, Asset Management; ISO 22301, Societal security - Business continuity management systems - Requirements, etc. The article, “The Right Fit: Selecting an FM management system standard for your facilities” in the May/June 2016 issue of IFMA’s FMJ can give you some guidance there. As you look at the scope and requirements of any MSS, a natural next question might be, “How do I begin to eat that elephant?”

Don’t be discouraged by what appears to be a massive, resource-heavy undertaking. This is the first in a series of articles that will help you break down the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) management system process into bite-sized pieces. It will help to understand that, while each MSS has its unique requirements, all ISO management systems begin with the familiar Deming Cycle — plan-do-check-act (PDCA) — as a framework (see figure 1).

The first step in devouring the ISO elephant is to define the parameters for what will be included in the certification. These boundaries are not the MSS Clause 1: Scope that you see in Figure 1. These borders establish which parts of your organizational assets, facilities, processes, policies and locations will be included in the certification program. By defining these parameters early, you’ll be able to build the decisions that follow upon a foundation with defined edges.

FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUSION

You can base the decisions on which facilities to include on multiple criteria, such as organizational alignment, geographic considerations, or type of physical or technology asset.

Additional criteria may surface as you begin to look at the facilities within your organization and analyze how they contribute to the business mission and impact the organizational objective delivery:

■ Organizational alignment can include criteria that determine metrics for the significance of each facility to the primary mission of the organization, such as:

- Mission criticality

- Activities performed within the building (e.g., administrative functions, retail, manufacturing, health care, education, assembly, training, recreation or housing)

- Locations of buildings in relation to the organizational layout (e.g., on campus or off campus, airside or landside, public or private)

- Climate of the facilities (economic, political or environmental criteria)

- Distinguishing outliers to the management system that may not be applicable ( for example, a storage warehouse in Antarctica may not be subject to the same procedures, policies and continual improvement plan that will be applied to facilities within the boundaries of the management system standard)

■ Geographic location can delineate criteria based on the physical location or proximity of facilities or infrastructure, such as proximity to other organizational assets, to land or water features, to climate zones, to useable renewable energy sources, to population, etc.

■ Physical asset criteria can set boundaries for which parts of a facility or campus will be included in the MSS certification. This category can include items like equipment, infrastructure, buildings or technology.

ORGANIZATIONAL INCLUSION

Organizational structure is the next consideration and delineates which departments, entities or functional roles within the business should be included in the boundaries of the certification.

Include parts of the organization that are critical to your FM operations. These departments should be both willing and able to commit to the processes, policies and continual improvement of the MSS, as they will need to dedicate resources and time to support their involvement. You can facilitate commitment by helping these departments understand the value proposition of implementing an MSS for the whole organization.

During the certification process, you’ll need to understand and document the impacts to the management system if a part of the organization cannot conform. It’s better to understand these factors before certifying rather than to invest in the inclusion of departments that cannot maintain the expectations set forth in the MSS. Nonconformity with the established MSS can be a problem for maintaining certification down the road. The focus should not only be on achieving certification, but also on maintaining and continually improving the performance of the management system and its effect on the organizational mission.

Some departments or divisions that may integrate and overlap with an FM management system standard and contribute to continual improvement can include:

■ Finance

■ Procurement

■ Real estate

■ Engineering and maintenance

■ Asset management

■ Human resources

■ Marketing and sales

■ Information and communication technology

■ Space planning

■ Energy management

■ Sustainability

■ Environmental health

■ Safety and security

■ Program or project management office

After you have determined the boundaries for which facilities and infrastructure components to include, as well as which parts of the organization to consider, you can decide which organizational processes should be included within your MSS. Not every FM process needs to be included in the MSS for certification. For example, it wouldn’t be necessary to include the procedures for outsourced janitorial services, unless they contribute toward more effective delivery of FM services.

A procedure for performance validation may be more appropriate to align service delivery with the organizational and financial goals. You should definitely consider those elements of the organization that contribute to effective and efficient delivery of FM services. Establishing criteria for which policies and procedures to include can be structured around themes for serving customer needs, improving employee efficiency, increasing productivity, reducing workplace calls or any other metric that is considered important to delivering the organizational mission.

Once you establish the criteria for policies and processes, evaluate the methodology for storing and tracking these crucial documents. Analyze whether using an enterprise asset management system (or a more sophisticated document management system) will work best for maintaining, disseminating, tracking and improving the MSS.

So far, we have looked inward at the organization to determine which physical and procedural parts would be best suited for inclusion in the MSS. Now, let’s turn toward the requirements listed in the MSS and review which of these are applicable to your organization and which can be excluded.

These requirements are known as the shall statements. Carefully reading through the shall statements and noting any that are not applicable to the organization can help your team focus on those that are relevant. You will need to justify the exclusion of any requirements when compiling the certification scope document. Limit your exclusions to only those requirements that are not applicable to your organization — include all others in the scope of the management system.

ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT REVIEW

Each organization will determine what factors drive the internal and external purpose of the facility management system, what constrains the system and what outcomes are most significant to the business. Defining stakeholders, setting expectations and understanding their requirements will all be important components for analyzing the organizational context of the facility management system.

External drivers are often associated with improved stakeholder confidence and assurance by defining mutually established outcomes and how they will be attained. You can support delivery of occupant organizational objectives through delineated activities, tools, processes and relationships.

Internal drivers focus on improving business performance through optimized financial investments that consider changes to investments and resources to service outcomes. Another internal focus may be service delivery, which analyzes the risks and potential consequences against financial goals. In-sourcing versus out-sourcing may be a consideration for service delivery options. This will affect how the MSS tracks performance and improvement.

Some stakeholder requirements that are important to understand early include the financial information and reporting to both internal and external parties, facility management decision-making criteria and non-financial reporting requirements.

Organizational context includes reviewing what the organization must do, wants to do and has the capacity to do. The must-do list is established by the organization’s regulatory and statutory obligations. The want-to-do list will contain goals that meet stakeholder needs or align with the organization’s primary objectives. You must analyze and understand the existing capacity to deliver both categories and sustain performance and improvement early in the process to discover gaps and determine the scope and boundaries for implementing your MSS. You can also include an additional element of organizational context, such as future goals to adapt to changing industry and market conditions.

When reviewing the boundaries of the management system and the span of influence it will have over organizational policies, procedures and daily activities, it is also important to consider any interfaces required or relationships with other management systems in place within the organization. Many ISO management system standards are designed to integrate well with each other and can offer overlapping benefits to an organization.

For those of you brave enough to venture down the path to ISO certification: Start looking at your organization in terms of what you would include in the certification boundaries, what criteria you would use to establish inclusion and how the organization is structured to support the certification process and continual improvement goals. Part of this support will come from gaining leadership commitment, which will be the next topic in our management system standards series.

If you are interested in getting involved in the development of ISO FM standards, or for more information, contact Laverne Deckert/IFMA Standards at ifmastandards@ifma.org.

1.) Whitaker, Jim. “Standardization: One of Today’s Most Vital Global FM Trends.” FMJ Jan./Feb. 2017. p. 32-35.

CASEY MARTIN has more than 20 years of building industry experience and is currently engaged in the Asset Management Strategies practice at Jacobs Engineering. In this role, she consults with private and U.S. federal institutions, providing full life cycle perspectives throughout project development stages. Her approach considers important long-term views such as total cost of ownership, reliability-centered maintenance practices, operation strategies, and processes and policies to align asset management with business and mission objectives.

Read the full article at http://fmj.ifma.org/article/Establishing+the+Boundaries+of+Your+MSS/2737129/392368/article.html.

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